WORLD WAR I: The Western Front

 

Plaque No 16: 

Capt Cecil M. Foss MC

Entered Hale School 1907 

28th Battalion
Killed in Action: Pozieres - 11 August 1916. Age 24

Captain Foss was from a farming family at Babakin. His nickname at school was "Nurse".

He joined the Western Australian 28th Battalion in 1915 and subsequently fought in the Gallipoli campaign. Later, in France, he led the first assault by Australian troops at Armentieres in April 1916 and was awarded the Military Cross for valour in action.

Australian forces then became involved in the August, Somme Valley offensive. Over twenty thousand young Australians were to subsequently lose their lives in the Pozieres/Mouquet Farm sector of the line.

Cecil Foss was the first Haleian killed in action in France at Pozieres village, in the push to control the heights overlooking the German lines.

Dedicated by Hale School. 

Placed by Ms Nadine Fraize who had recently resigned from her post as Head of Languages at Hale School to return to her native country of France. 

Ms Fraize expressed her pleasure at being asked to lay this plaque as an expression of the strong bond, even today, between the French and Australian people, a lasting legacy of the involvement of Australians in France during the Great War.

 

Plaque No 17:

Capt A. Barr Montgomery m.i.d.

Hale School, 1903-1911

Worcester Regiment British Army
Killed in Action: Mouquet Farm, close to Pozieres - 17 August 1916. Age 25

Captain Montgomery had been Captain of School in 1911 and was also the first player to take a hundred wickets in Darlot Cup cricket. A promising career, both on the sporting field and in business lay ahead of him when he finished his education.

At the outbreak of war in 1914, however, he left university and joined the Worcester Regiment of the British Army and was posted to the Western Front where he was mentioned in despatches for his efforts in the front line.

Dedicated by Hale School. 

Placed by the then Captain of School, Clancy Rudeforth. 

 

Plaque No 18:

Cpl Lance H. Hester

Hale School, 1906-1908

51st Battalion
Killed in Action: Mouquet Farm, Pozieres - 3 September 1916. Age 23.

Corporal Hester, from a farming family in Bridgetown, entered Hale School in 1906 and later was a member of the 1910 Battalion Cup shooting team which won the state schoolboy's title.

Dedicated by his family. 

Placed by his sister-in-law Mrs Dorothy Hester, assisted by his niece, Mrs Anne Harse. 

 

Plaque No 19:

Cpl James Oliver Gemmell

Hale School 1903-1906 

11th/51st Battalion
Killed in Action Mouquet Farm, Pozieres - 3 Sept 1916. Age 26.

Not long after the outbreak of the Great War Corporal Gemmell joined the Western Australian 11th Battalion (January 1915) and served with them on Gallipoli.

He transferred to the 51st Battalion and travelled with them to France and went into action with them later in the year during the great Somme offensive.

Dedicated by his family. 

 

Plaque No 20:

C.S.M. Laurence A. Renou DCM

Hale School 1908-09

52nd Battalion
Died of Wounds: Hampshire England - 6 November 1916. Age 24.

His father was a civil engineer. The family lived at Cannington.

Joined the predominantly Tasmanian 12th Battalion and then transferred to the more recently formed 52nd Battalion for the Pozieres offensive, as a Company Sergeant-Major, having earlier been decorated with the Distinguished Conduct Medal for his services on Gallipoli.

Was badly wounded at Pozieres and died of those wounds in England.

Dedicated by Hale School. 

Placed by Mr George Kailis, then Chairman of the Buildings and Grounds sub-committee of the Hale School Board of Governors. 

 

Plaque No 21:

Cpl Francis H. Christie

entered Hale School in 1894

11th Battalion
Died Of Wounds: Dieppe France - 22 November 1916. Age 34

Corporal Frank Christie's father was a Perth bank manager. The family lived in West Perth and Frank was enrolled at Hale School in 1894.

On the outbreak of war, Frank joined the 6th Reinforcements of the 11th Battalion in time to serve on Gallipoli. He then went with the battalion to France and was also wounded at Pozieres. He died some weeks later at Dieppe.

Dedicated by Hale School. 

Placed by Mr Ray Hepworth, a member of the Highgate RSL sub-committee responsible for the manufacture and maintenance of the hundreds of commemorative plaques in Kings Park. Mr Hepworth's particular help in the commemorative project at Hale has been invaluable and very much appreciated. 

 

Plaque No 22:

Lt-Col  Leslie Tilney DSO VD

entered Hale School 1914

16th /13th Battalions
Died of Wounds: Australia. Aged 47.

Lieutenant-Colonel Leslie Tilney DSO attended Hale School in the 1880s. He became a regular army officer and when war was declared he was appointed second-in-charge of the Western Australian 16th Battalion.

He served with distinction on Gallipoli and was awarded the Distinguished Service Order for his efforts.

He was subsequently appointed the commanding officer of the 13th Battalion when they were transferred to France. He was wounded at Pozieres when they were engaged there. He was repatriated to Australia but died of his wounds the following year.

Dedicated by Hale School. 

Placed by Mr Tom Hoar, former Deputy Headmaster of Hale School, whose father and uncle both served in the Western Front trenches during the Great War. 

"Most of the Australian forces were then moved northward during the 1916/17 winter lull in the fighting. Their next involvement was to be in the region of Bullecourt in March, 1917."

       

Plaque No 23:

Lt W.E. (William) Cook

 Hale School 1900-1902 

28th Battalion
Killed in Action: Bullecourt - 27 March 1917. Age 25

Lieutenant William Cook attended Hale School from 1900 to 1902. He joined the Western Australian 28th Battalion early in 1916.

He survived the first year or so in France until he went into the line in Bullecourt, the location where more Australians were killed than in any other battle in our history.

Dedicated by Hale School.   

Placed by the then President of the Hale Old Boys' Association, Mr Mark Rogers (1970-75), accompanied by his son Alexander. 

 

Plaque No 24:

Pte Frederick S. Miller

Hale School 1900-1902 

51st Battalion
Killed in Action: Bullecourt - 2 April 1917. Age 32

Private Fred Miller was from Cottelsoe. After leaving school he worked on station properties in the north-west of the state. He joined the 51st Battalion as a reinforcement in 1916 and was killed at Bullecourt on 2nd April 1917.

Dedicated by Hale School. 

Placed by his niece Mrs Constance Barrett-Lennard, assisted by her grandson, Old Haleian Nicholas Clark (1991-98). 

 

Plaque No 25:

Lt John A. Shadwick

Hale School, 1900 - 1901

48th Battalion
Killed in Action: Bullecourt - 11 April 1917. Age 25

Lieutenant John Shadwick was a staff member at Hale School before the outbreak of the Great War. He subsequently joined the 48th Battalion and was killed in action at Bullecourt.

Dedicated by Hale School  

Placed by Mr Brian Heibner, then President of the Hale School Staff Common Room Association. 

 

Plaque No 26:

Sgt Astley C. Cooper

Hale School 1892-1900 

8th Battery 6th A.F.A. Bde
Killed in Action: Messines Ridge - 25 June 1917. Age 35

Sergeant Astley Cooper attended Hale School between 1892 and 1900. He won a School English prize in 1896.

After leaving school he trained as an engineer at the Kalgoorlie School of Mines and subsequently lived in South Perth. He joined an artillery unit at the outbreak of the war and served on Gallipoli with the 8th Field Artillery Battery. He then went to the Western Front and was killed at the Battle of Messines Ridge, after nearly three years of continuous service.

Dedicated by Hale School. 

Placed by his daughter Mrs Kathleen Astley Rigg of Claremont, assisted by her sons John and Bill and grandson Sam. Mrs Rigg was a donor toward the building of the Hale School Memorial Hall nearly 40 years before and is a great-great niece of Hale School's very first pupil in 1858, Laurence Eliot of Bunbury. 

 

Plaque No 27:

Lt George L.C. Clifton

entered Hale School - 1907

28th Battalion/ No 1 Sqn R.F.C.
Died Flying Training: Doullens, Somme Valley - 22 July 1917. Age 21

Lieutenant George Clifton, the son of the State Under-Secretary for Lands, Mr Robert Clifton, enrolled at Hale School in 1907. He joined the 28th Battalion as a private and served on Gallipoli. When the unit went to France he transferred to the Royal Flying Corps and trained as a pilot. He was posted to No 1 Squadron, Royal Flying Corps, in France, but was killed in a flying accident at Doullens.

Dedicated by his family. 

Placed by his sister, Mrs Minarose Sherlock, assisted by her daughter Mrs Ann Cornish. 

 

Plaque No 28:

Pte Francis F. Cobham

Entered Hale School 1910   

28th Battalion
Killed In Action: Menin Road, Belgium - 20 September 1917. Age 19 

Private Francis Cobham's father, Walter, was a Perth bank manager.

Francis entered Hale School in 1910 and eventually embarked for the Western Front as a replacement in the 28th Battalion early in 1917. He was killed in action in Belgium a few months after joining the battalion.

Dedicated by two younger Old Boys of the School, David and Sam Benson. Their great-great-uncle Lewis John Broad, of the Western Australian 11th Battalion, was killed in the same vicinity as Francis Cobham - Menin Road, Belgium - on the same day, the 20th September 1917. 


Placed by Mrs Sue Benson and Sam Benson.

"Later in 1917 the Australian forces were moved northward again into the Ypres, Belgian, sector of the line, in an attempt to break through the infamous Passchenaele Ridge and on to capture the Channel ports." 

 

Plaque No 29:

Pte Harry D. Russell

Entered Hale School 1900

11th Battalion
Killed in Action: Passchendaele - 12 October 1917. Age 32

Private Harry Russell's father was a Perth produce merchant. Harry entered Hale School in 1900 and joined the 11th Battalion when it was first forming. He was one of those who landed on Gallipoli in the early hours of the 25th April 1915.

He survived Gallipoli and eighteen months of trench warfare in France and Belgium, but was then killed in action at Passchendaele.

Dedicated by Hale School.   

Placed by Mrs Heather Varley, representing the Hale School Parents and Friends Association. 

 

Plaque No 30:

Lt Victor A. Harwood

Hale School 1898-1904

51st Battalion
Killed in Action: Passchendaele - 12 October 1917. Age 30   

Lieutenant Victor Harwood attended Hale School between 1898 and 1904.

He joined up in 1916 and was posted to the 51st Battalion on the Western Front.

Dedicated by Hale School.   

Placed by his nephew, Mr James Harwood of York, assisted by his great-niece, Liz Reid. 

 

Plaque No 31:

Lieut. E.A. [Aubrey] Mutton Murray

Hale School 1903-1905 

48th Battalion
Killed in Action: Passchendaele - 12 October 1917. Age 26

Edward Aubrey Mutton was born in Coogee, Sydney in 1891, the first-born son of Harold Mutton and Nellie Watts.  After the marriage broke up his mother married New Zealander, Matthew Murray whom she met  in Kalgoorlie during the late gold rush period.  

The family moved to a farm, 'WONGANELLA' in the mid-northern wheatbelt region and when it failed due to drought they moved to Perth. 

Aubrey attended The High School between 1903 and 1905. He was working as a teacher when he enlisted in the 1st Australian Imperial Force early in 1916.

He was posted to the predominantly Western Australian 48th Infantry Battalion and was with them when they were involved in the Pozieres and Bullecourt battles on the Western Front in France in late 1916 and early 1917.

He was killed in action at Passchendaele in Belgium during the Allied push to break through the German lines to the channel ports beyond Ypres.

Dedicated by the Vinnicombe Family. 

Placed by his nephew, Haleian Max Vinnicombe, assisted by his great-nephew, Scotch Collegian Hamish Vinnicombe. 

 

Plaque No 32:

Cpl Francis M. Lodge

 Hale School 1908-1912

51st Battalion
Killed in Action: Passchendaele - 12 October 1917. Age 20

Corporal Francis Lodge lived on The Esplanade at Cottesloe. He attended Hale School from 1908 to 1912.

He also joined the 51st Battalion in 1916 and was killed at Passchendaele.

Dedicated by his family. 

Placed by his cousin, Mrs Constance Barrett-Lennard, assisted by Haleians, Mr Harry and Mr Arthur Lodge, also cousins - and whose father fought on the Western Front with an artillery unit between 1916 and 1918. 

 

Plaque No 33:

Pte William G. Mudie 

Enrolled at Hale 1913

11th Battalion
Killed in Action: Passchendaele - 31 October 1917. Age 20

William Mudie's family lived in Fremantle. He joined the 11th Battalion in 1916 and was posted to the Western Front as a reinforcement.

Dedicated by Hale School. 

Placed by Mrs Jane Inverarity. 

 

Plaque No 34:

Dvr Harold L.Thomas

 Enrolled at Hale 1906

110th Howitzer Battery 
Died of Wounds: Surrey England - 5 November 1917. Aged 23

Driver Harold Thomas was the son of a Perth lawyer. He embarked for France late in 1916 and was posted to the 110th Howitzer artillery battery as a horse handler. He was badly wounded during the assault on Passchedaele Ridge and died of his wounds in England.

Dedicated by Hale School. 

Placed by Old Boy and then current member of the Hale School Board of Governors, Mr David Aitken, assisted by his son Jacob. 

 

Plaque No 35:

Lt Colin C. Harwood

Entered Hale School 1907

10th Australian Light Horse/British Army
Died of Wounds: Nottingham UK - 6 November 1917. Age 23

Lieutenant Colin Harwood's father, Joshua, was an architect and builder in Perth. Colin, brother of Victor eventually went on to qualify as a surveyor.

He joined the 10th Light Horse Regiment in May 1915 and served on Gallipoli as a trooper. Later he was commissioned into a British regiment and was wounded in the fighting around Ypres in Belgium. He was transferred to a hospital in Nottingham in England but died there of his wounds.

Dedicated by Hale School.   

Placed by a former commanding officer of the 10th Light Horse Regiment in Western Australia, Haleian Lieutenant-Colonel John Deykin. 

 

Plaque No 36:

Lt Charles O. Piesse 

Hale School 1900-1906   

11th Battalion
Died of Wounds : Rouen France - 7 December 1917

Lieutenant Charles Piesse was from a farming family in the Wagin district. His father was a long serving member of the Legislative Council in the Western Australian parliament.

Charles attended Hale School from 1900 to 1906. His nickname at school was "Oxo". He joined the 11th Battalion early in 1916 and went off to the Western Front as a platoon commander. He was wounded at Passchendaele and died of his wounds in Rouen, France.

Dedicated by his family.    

Placed by his nephew, Mr Jock Johnston, assisted by his niece, Geraldine Harkness. 

'The Australians were moved back southward to the Somme Valley sector in France in time for the last ditch German "Michael" offensive of March and April in 1918.  Australian troops helped turn the tide in the desperate fighting which took place around the town of Villers-Brettoneaux, within sight of the major French city of Amiens.'

 

Plaque No 37:

Pte Arthur H. Walton

Hale School 1893-1894

51st Battalion
Killed in Action: Villers-Brettoneaux - 2 April 1918.  Age 34

Private Arthur Walton, the son of a Perth Inspector, attended Hale School in 1893 and 1894. He trained as a teacher and worked for the Education Department until he joined the 51st Battalion in France late in 1916.

He was killed in action during the early phase of the furious defensive actions at Villers-Brettoneaux.

Dedicated by Hale School. 

Placed by the then Deputy Headmaster of Hale School, Mr Roy Kelley. 

 

Plaque No 38:

Lieut. Francis S. Burt

Hale School 1986-1897

4th Machine Gun Coy
Killed in Action: Villers Brettoneaux - 24 April 1918. Age 32

Lieutenant Francis Burt, the son of Queen's Counsel, Septimus Burt, attended Hale School in 1896 and 1897, before going off to Repton School in England to complete his education. He returned to Australia, joined up in the middle of 1916 and embarked for Europe in October.

He was initially posted to the 25th Field Artillery Battery and then transferred to the 4th Machine Gun Company. He was with that unit when he was killed in action at Villers-Brettoneaux.

Francis Burt’s commemorative plaque in Kings Park, WA is the first one comes to (No 1) after exiting from the State War Memorial precinct through the western entry (near the eternal flame).

Dedicated by his family. 

Placed by his nephew, Sir Francis Burt, assisted by then Hale School Year 9 student, Digby Burges, a great-great nephew of Lieutenant Francis Burt. 

 

Plaque No 39:

Gnr Ernest F. Parker

 Hale School 1894-1896

102nd Howitzer Battery 
Killed in Action: Hazebrouch - 2 May 1918. Age 34

Gunner Ernie Parker, son of a Perth lawyer, in the family tradition, enrolled at Hale School in 1894. He later moved on to St Peter's in Aelaide in 1897 and 1898. After leaving school he too trained as a lawyer, but he is best remembered for his exploits on the sporting field. He won many state titles on the tennis court (seven singles titles), in 1913 he won the Australasian singles title and was also state doubles champion many times.

Remarkably, at the same time, he was also an outstanding cricketer, playing with great success against English touring teams and against other state sides in an era when travelling was extremely difficult. He was chosen in a 'Rest of Australia' side and, according to many, was also close to test selection.

He is commemorated in the Western Australian sporting Hall of Fame at the Superdrome in Floreat Park.

He joined up as a gunner/private late in 1917 and was posted to the 102nd Howitzer Battery for service on the Western Front. He served for almost exactly one year before being killed in action.

Dedicated by his family. 

Placed by his great-niece, Geraldine Jorgenson. 

 

Plaque No 40:

Pte Leonard W. Snell

Hale School 1899-1901 

11th Battalion
Killed in Action: Villers-Brettoneaux - 11 May 1918. Age 31

Private Leonard Snell began work as a bank officer when he left school. He was one of those who joined the 11th Battalion in 1914 at the outset of the war and he subsequently took part in the first landing at Gallipoli.

He was transferred to a Field Ambulance unit but was court martialled for disobeying orders on several occasions. It seems he may well have had enough. He was sent back to Australia to serve two years in a military prison. On completion of his sentence he was shipped back to France and was posted to the 51st Infantry Battalion where he was subsequently killed in action.

Dedicated by Hale School. 

Placed by then Year 12 prefect and Captain of Wilson House, James Eyres, the recipient that year of the Guy Ward prize for the most outstanding boarder. 

'After successfully preventing the 'Michael' offensive from breaking through in its drive toward Paris, the Allied forces went back on the offensive down the Somme Valley again. Australian troops were involved in that area for the final phases of the war.'

 

Plaque No 41:

Pte Edwin O. Moseley 

Entered Hale School 1894

16th Battalion
Killed in Actio : Somme Valley - 8 August 1918. Age 36

Private Edwin Moseley lived in Cottesloe. He, too, joined up quite late and embarked for Europe in November 1917. He was posted to the Western Australian 16th Battalion and was killed in action in the drive eastward down the Somme Valley.

Dedicated by Hale School.   

Placed by Hale School Board of Governors member, Mr Jeff Broun, assisted by his son Tyson. 

 

Plaque No 42:

Percy R. T. Lovegrove

Hale School 1900-1902

British Army Engineers 
Died Of Disease: Derby, England – 1918. Age 30

Percy Lovegrove, son of the local doctor at Pinjarra, Charles Lovegrove, attended Hale School between 1900 and 1902. After leaving school he went to England, trained as an engineer in Glasgow, Scotland and then travelled the world and was involved in many adventures while engaged in his professional work.

On the outbreak of war he joined the Royal Engineers in the British Army. While serving in the trenches, however, he contracted pneumonia, was repatriated to England but died in a Derbyshire hospital.

Dedicated by Hale School. 

Placed by a great-nephew, Mr Gordon McLarty, representing the McLarty family of Pinjarra. 

 

Plaque No 43:

Lt Geoffrey D. Orchard

Entered Hale School 1897

16th Battalion
Died of Wounds: Rouen France - 15 October 1918. Aged 31

Lieutenant Geoffrey Orchard was the son of a Perth clergyman.

He subsequently joined the 16th Battalion in 1914 and served on Gallipoli. Promoted from Sergeant to Lieutenant, he served right through the Western Front campaign until he was wounded in the final phases of the war. He died in Rouen, France just three weeks before the end of the war.

Dedicated by Hale School. 

Placed by his niece, Mrs Penelope Buxton and the then Chairman of the Hale School Board of Governors, Dr Eric Isaachsen. 

 

Go to the Second World War RAAF/RAF Plaques

 

MEMORIAL GROVE  

Introduction

Pre WW1 (1)

WW1  
Gallipoli (2-15)
Western Front (16-43)

WW2
  
RAAF/RAF (44-65)
Middle East (66-83)
South West Pacific (84-121)

Korea (122-123)