Australia & the South-West Pacific Theatre

 

Plaque No 83:

Pilot Officer G.E. ('Goggie') Turner (Hale School 1931-1932)
25 Sqn RAAF

He attended Hale School in 1931 and 1932 from South Perth . He represented the School in athletics and football

After leaving Hale he joined Elder Smiths as a stud/stock agent and when war broke out he joined the Royal Australian Air Force to train as a pilot.

He was killed 31st January 1941 while on a night flying exercise at 'Archerfield' aerodrome in Queensland . He was 23 years of age.

Laid by close School friend, Haleian Mr Owen Burges,
himself a member of Air Crew during World War II.

Plaque 84: 

Squadron Leader Roy C. Phillipps MC DFC (Entered Hale School 1906)

He entered Hale School in 1906. He became an accountant in Fremantle and then travelled to the Kimberleys to work as a jackeroo/bookkeeper on a station.

On the outbreak of WWI he joined the 28th Infantry Battalion and then served with them on Gallipoli and then in France . He received a severe leg wound at Fleurs but instead of being repatriated home he transferred to No 68 Squadron of the infant Australian Flying Corps as part of the ground crew establishment.

He learned to fly and went solo after only one hour forty-five minutes in a Maurice Farman bi-plane.

He became a 'fighting scout' pilot and ended the war as the 2nd highest scoring 'ace' in No 2 Squadron of the Australian Flying Corps with several MCs and a DFC.

When World War II broke out he was appointed Squadron Leader Officer Command No 2 Empire Flight Training Scheme at Archerfield in Brisbane . He was killed in a flying accident on 21st May, 1941

Laid by his Old Haleian nephew, Mr Tony Lloyd

Plaque No 85:

Lt  James I.Clifton (Hale School 1930-1932)
HMAS Sydney

Jim Clifton (sometimes known as "Scut") lived in Subiaco and attended Hale School between 1930 and 1932. He was described on his School report as being poor at sports but of fine character.

Upon leaving school he joined the staff of the Bank of Adelaide in Fremantle and studied to become an accountant, eventually being admitted to the Commonwealth Institute of Accountants in 1936.

He was a member of the Old Haleian's hockey club, sailed at the Royal Freshwater Bay Yacht Club and was a member of the Royal Australian Naval Reserve.

Upon the outbreak of war he was posted to H.M.A.S. 'Cerberus' in September 1939. He saw service in Singapore and then was posted to H.M.A.S. ' Sydney ' in June 1941.

He was serving in the Sydney on 11th November of that year, during the fatal engagement with the German raider, Kormoran off the coast of Western Australia near Geraldton and was one of those 647 sailors who were lost. He was 25 years of age.

Laid by his brother, Mr Doug Clifton, who also served on the Sydney but was fortunate enough to be drafted onto a course at Flinders naval depot before the fatal action, assisted by his daughter, and niece of Jim and Steve, Mrs Mary Pfister.

Plaque No 86:

Lt C. M. (Steve) Clifton   m.i.d. (Hale School 1925-1927)
2/16th & 2/27th Battalions   

He was Jim Clifton's elder brother. He attended Hale School from 1925 to 1927 and then qualified as a chartered accountant in 1935. He was a keen yachtsman, competed in the King's Prize for rifle shooting and was a member of the Australian militia forces before the war.

In 1940 he enlisted in the Western Australian 2/16th Battalion and served in the Middle Eastern Theatre from late 1940 to early 1942.

When the unit returned to Australia he was one of those who fought and helped turn back the Japanese forces along the Kokoda Track in New Guinea during the August and September of 1942, after which he was awarded a Mentioned in Despatches.

He was then commissioned, transferred to the South Australian 2/27th Battalion and was killed in action on Bougainville Island just weeks before the war ended in August, 1945. He was 32 years of age.

Laid by his brother, Mr Doug Clifton, assisted by his daughter,
and niece of Jim and Steve, Mrs Mary Pfister.

Plaque No 87:

Lieut. H.J. (Jack) Manning (Hale School 1929-1930)
2/4 Machine Gun Battalion

He attended Hale School from Mount Lawley between 1929 and 1930.

He was a member of the Cameron Highlanders Militia Regiment before the war and eventually was commissioned into the 2/4th Machine Gun Battalion as a Lieutenant after the outbreak of World War II.

He was posted to Malaya with his unit and fought with them from the time the Japanese first landed until they advanced on Singapore in February. He was killed in action from a direct hit by an artillery shell on 12th February, just three days before the surrender. He was 27 years of age.

Laid by the then President of the 2/4th Machine-Gun Battalion Association,
Mr Jack Kyros.

Plaque No 88:

Lieut. G.A. (Geoffrey) Raphael  (Hale School 1925-1934)
2/4th  Machine Gun Battalion

He attended Hale School between 1925 and 1934 from West Perth .

He was a prefect and took part in rowing, cricket, football and boxing; he was also active in debating and drama.

After leaving School he eventually joined his father's firm but continued with his great interest in photography. Before the war he joined the militia 28th Battalion and was commissioned while serving with that unit.

Eventually he joined the 2/4th Machine Gunners and arrived in Singapore on the day that the city fell to the Japanese. The next day he was detailed into a work party by his captors and upon finishing the work he and his men were summarily executed. Geoffrey was 25 years of age.

After the war Geoffrey's family donated a trophy to the School in his memory. Initially it was awarded for photography but in latter years it has been awarded to the Hale student who has made the most valuable contribution to the chess fraternity in the School - The Geoffrey Raphael Prize for Chess.

Laid by sister, Mrs Audrey van Hattem.

Plaque No 89:

Aubyn W.J.  Dimmitt (Hale School 1929-1932)
British Admiralty

He attended Hale School between 1929 and 1932. He was a prefect in his final year.

He then attended the University of Western Australia and graduated as an engineer at the end of 1938.

Subsequently he was transferred to Singapore around 1940 and from there was seconded into the British Admiralty after the outbreak of hostilities in the region.

He was evacuated from Singapore in February 1942 but the ship in which he was sailing was sunk the next day. He managed to join other survivors but after some weeks of swimming and canoeing from island to island he perished on an unknown island in the South China Sea . He was 28 years of age.

Laid by his brother, Mr Richard Dimmitt, assisted by his sons Aubyn and Simon.

Plaque No 90:

Surgeon Cmdr E.M. (Eric) Tymms DSC (Entered Hale School 1915)
HMAS Perth

He was born in Rockhampton , Queensland but was enrolled at Hale School as a ten year old in 1915. His father conducted a medical practice in West Perth .

After leaving Hale School in 1924, he moved interstate to study medicine. He began service with the Royal Australian Naval Reserve in 1935.

He joined the complement of the cruiser, H.M.A.S. Perth in 1940 and was subsequently awarded a Distinguished Service Cross for his work during the Crete campaign in the Mediterranean Sea in 1941.

The Perth returned to the Australian region and Eric was killed when the ship was sunk during the Battle of the Sunda Straits ( Indonesia ) on 1st March 1942. He was 37 years of age

Laid by Mr Arthur Bancroft, a Hale School grandparent,
representing the HMAS Perth Survivors' Association.

Plaque No 91:

Fl. Off  L.V.H. (Linton) Birt (Hale School 1931-1933)
No 4 Secondary Flight Training School,  RAAF

Linton Birt attended Hale School between 1931 and 1933 from Subiaco. At School he played cricket and football and in his reports is described as being an 'above average' student.

After leaving School he worked in the English, Scottish and Australian bank and played on a wing for the Old Haleians hockey club.

On the outbreak of war he joined the Royal Australian Air Force and eventually qualified as a navigator. He was killed on 9 October 1942 when an Avro Anson aircraft crashed at Clackline, near Northam, on a flight from Cunderdin to Pearce air force base. He was 25 years of age.

Laid by Haleian, Selwyn Clark DFC,
a Royal Australian Air Force fighter pilot during World War II

Plaque No 92:

L.A.C.  G.H. (George) Le Mercier (Hale School 1926-1929)
RAAF

He attended Hale School between 1926 and 1929 as a boarder from Dwellingup. He was well known as a very good rifle shot.

He joined the Royal Australian Air Force during the war and travelled to the Eastern States for further training. He died on active service at Concord , New South Wales in April, 1942. He was 26 years of age.

Laid by Hale grandparent, Mr Don Meredith,
a pilot with the Royal Australian Air Force during World War II.

Plaque No 93:

P/O  W.B. (Bill) Stubbs (Hale School 1930-1932)
Pilot - No 2 Wireless Operator/Airgunnerery School

He was a boarder from a farming family at Kondinin and attended Hale School between 1930 and 1932. He was an outstanding sportsman being in the 1st XI for two years and was full forward in the 1st XVIII.

In the middle of 1941 he joined the RAAF and eventually completed his pilot training at Cunderdin and at Geraldton. He was then posted to a flight training school at Forbes in N.S.W.. He was one of the high percentage of volunteers who lost his life in a training accident with a student pilot when wartime procedures were necessarily hurried and somewhat perfunctory. He was 25 years of age. His wife gave birth to their son sometime after his death.

Laid by Mr Bruce West of East Fremantle .

Plaque No 94:

Aircraftsman I.F. (Ivan) Buhler (Hale School 1920-1926)
No 9 Empire Flight Training School, RAAF

He attended Hale School from 1920 to 1926. Upon leaving he joined his father's music business in central

He was another who lost his life under unfortunate circumstances during the course of the war - he in fact died of innoculation paralysis shortly after his service had begun.

Laid by the then retiring Deputy Headmaster of Hale School , Mr Roy Kelley.

Plaque No 95:

Sgt David K. Godfrey  (Hale School 1929-1938)
6 Sqn RAAF

He attended Hale School between 1929 and 1938. Though suffering severely from asthma he was in the Athletics team and a member of the 1st XVIII. 

Upon leaving school he trained in a Kalgoorlie iron foundry before joining the RAAF where he qualified as a Wireless Operator/Air Gunner. He was a member of a No. 6 Squadron Hudson bomber aircraft crew which sank a Japanese submarine off the New South Wales coast on 6th June 1942.

He was classified Missing in Action near Milne Bay, New Guinea on 25th August 1942 while his squadron aircraft were operating against Japanese naval forces active in the waters of the Coral Sea, between New Guinea and the mainland of Australia. He was 22 years of age.

Laid by a friend of the Godfrey family, Haleian Dr Ken Tregonning,
a former member of the Royal Australian Air Force in World War II

Plaque No 96:

Pte J.C. (John) Lee Steere (Entered Hale School 1925)
2/16th  Battalion

He entered Hale School in February 1925 as a boarder from Boyup Brook. His nickname was "Jiggles".

After returning to the family farm "Jayes" for a time he joined the Western Australian 2/16th Infantry Battalion in 1941 and went with them to New Guinea in August 1942 to help defend the Kokoda Track against the Japanese drive towards Port Morseby.

He was killed in action on 30th August 1942 at Abuari, on the right flank of the four day Battle of Isurava which was prove so crucial in halting the Japanese advance. He was 28 years of age.

Laid by his cousin and nephew, Mr Wilfred Lee Steere,
who still farms on the family property at Boyup Brook.

Plaque No 97:

Driver Forrest Lee Steere (Entered Hale School 1924)
2/4 Machine Gun Battalion

He entered Hale School as a boarder from " Greenfield ", Boyup Brook in 1924.

He returned to the farm and then joined the 2/4th Machine-Gunners on 10th August 1940. He travelled with his unit to Singapore and was with them at the surrender to the Japanese forces on 15th February 1942.

For 15 months he languished in Changi Gaol as a prisoner-of-war until he was moved to work on the infamous Thai-Burma railway in April 1943. While there he contracted cholera, rallied but then died several days later on 3rd October 1943, too weak from overwork and malnutrition to fully recover. He was 36 years of age.

Laid by his cousin and nephew, Mr Wilfred Lee Steere,
who still farms on the family property at Boyup Brook.

Plaque No 98:

Lieut. E.W. (Bill) Grigg (Hale School 1932-1934)
2/16th Battalion

He attended Hale School from Darlington between 1932 and 1934. He rowed with the first crew in his final year at school.

He took up architecture in Perth and after war broke out joined the Western Australian 2/16th Battalion in 1940. He travelled with them to the Middle East and while there was commissioned and served as an intelligence officer during the Syrian Campaign.

After the 2/16th battalion returned to Australia, he travelled with them to New Guinea and fought right through the defence of the Kokoda Track campaign until they were finally pulled out of the line in the middle of September.

The battalion was then moved to the rear to re-fit and take on re-inforcements preparatory to being inserted back into the frontline. He was accidentally killed by a falling tree at the Sogeri encampment on 24 October 1942. He was 25 years of age.

Laid by his brother, Haleian Mr Peter Grigg, assisted by his cousin,
Mr Keith Norrish, also a veteran of the Kokoda Track campaign
and then the President of the 2/16th Battalion Association.

Plaque No 99:

Lieut. C.M. (Charlie) White
2/16th Battalion

His father was killed before he was born during World War I. His mother ran a boarding house in West Perth and managed to send her son to Hale School where he was the Junior Dux in 1932.

He subsequently joined the Commonwealth Bank and remained involved with the Hale Old Boys Hockey Club until the outbreak of war.

Along with a number of Haleian contemporaries, he joined the 2/16th Infantry Battalion and subsequently served with them through the Syrian campaign in the Middle East during 1941. He was then commissioned and served with the battalion during the Kokoda Track campaign of August and September, 1942.

When the battalion was re-inserted back into action in December, he was wounded while on a night patrol near Gona Village . While he was being brought back in for treatment he was hit again and was killed.  He was 25 years of age.

Laid by Mr Pel Williams, a close friend of Charlie's before the war and during the actions in which the 2/16th Battalion were involved.

Plaque No 100:

Sgt Peter Duce  (Hale School 1927-1931)  
2/16th  Battalion

He attended Hale School as a boarder from Boyanup between 1927 and 1931. He was a left arm opening bowler for the 1st XI.

He returned to the family farm after leaving school and excelled at both cricket and horsemanship in the local district - he was a member of the 10th Light Horse regiment in Bunbury in the 1930s.

On the outbreak of war, he joined the 2/16th Infantry Battalion and subsequently served with the unit in Syria . Later he survived the Kokoda Track campaign where he was wounded in action.

In November he rejoined his unit and was with them when they made attacks on Japanese positions at Gona Village beginning in late November 1942. Sergeant Peter Duce took part in the final attack against the entrenched Japanese on the 8th December. He was killed in action in the early afternoon of that day. He was 28 years of age.

In his memory the Duce family, in 1964, financed and help build the scoreboard with still stands on the boundary of Craig Oval to this day.  A plaque to his memory has been placed there.

Laid by his nephews, Haleians Marcus and Peter Duce of Boyanup

Plaque No 101:

Pte  D.N. (Doug) Russell  (Hale School 1926-1931)  
2/4th  Machine Gun Battalion

Doug Russell, or "Rusty", attended Hale School from Claremont between 1926 and 1931. He represented the school in the 1st XI, swimming and in the 1st XVIII.

After leaving school he joined the Commonwealth Bank and was also in the Citizen's Military Forces at Claremont , training with the machine-gun company.

He enlisted in late 1940 to join the 2/4th Machine-Gun Battalion. He left Australia in January 1942 to serve in Malaya and was captured by the Japanese when Singapore fell on 15th  February.

He was eventually sent to work on the Burma-Thailand railway and died there of disease and malnutrition in January 1943. He was 29 years of age.

Dedicated and laid by Haleian Mr Doug Rowe, son of 'Rusty' Russell's best friend at School, Mr Jack Rowe. Jack was Captain of Hale School in 1931 and donated Pte Russell's plaque in memory of his close friend.

Plaque No 102:

Desmond N.K. Smith (Hale School 1936-1937)

He attended Hale School in 1936 and 1937. His report records that he had average ability but good application.

His father was Area Manager of the State gold-crushing batteries in the Eastern Goldfields and when he left School he returned to the region and worked for the Commonwealth Bank in Kalgoorlie .

He joined the army in 1941 and subsequently trained as a commando, finally serving with the 2nd/5th Independent Company behind enemy lines in New Guinea . He was killed near Wau , Papua New Guinea on the 27th January 1943. He was 21 years of age.

Laid by his brother, Old Haleian Mr Geoff Smith,
who also served with the Royal Navy during the war and who
travelled from Victoria to be present at the dedication ceremony.

Plaque No 103:

Athol C.K. Smith (Hale School 1929-1931)

He attended Hale School from 1929 to 1931 as a boarder. He had an outstanding scholastic record and was usually the top of his class each year, though it is recorded that he was not particularly good at sport.

On leaving School he joined the AMP Society and pursued actuarial studies, which eventually took him to Sydney and then to London . At the outbreak of war he joined the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve and subsequently served on the HMS Stork in the North Sea before being transferred to HMS Fairmiles at Falmouth in the south of England . He was appointed liason officer of the flotilla but while on exercises with the Royal Air Force he was involved in a plane crash over the Bristol Channel and lost his life on 7th October 1941. He was 25 years of age.

The Headmaster's chair was donated to the School after the war by the Smith family in memory of their two boys. It has now graced our School assemblies for over 50 years.

Laid by brother, Mr Geoff Smith.

Plaque No 104:

G.A. (George) Bremner (Entered Hale School 1918)

He came from a farming family in Beverley.  He entered Hale School in 1918 when the boarders were still using the old Pensioner Guards' hospital in George Street, West Perth.

 

After leaving school he took up farming with his brother at Corrigin. He later married Elizabeth Bussell, a member of the early Western Australian pioneering family.

After the outbreak of war, He joined the army in 1942 and served with the 2/16th Battalion in the Middle Eastern theatre of operations. After returning to Australia with his unit early in 1942, he and his contemporaries were sent to fight the Japanese along the Kokoda Track in the August and September of that year.

He was promoted to the rank of Sergeant and was transferred to the 2/5th Infantry Battalion and while serving with them in New Guinea he died of wounds on the 15th February, 1943. He was 40 years of age.

Laid by his Haleian nephew, Mr Peter Bremner of Beverley.

Plaque No 105:

A.M.M. (Arthur)  Brazier (Entered Hale School 1919)

He was from a farming family and was a boarder from Kirup in the South-West. He entered Hale School in 1919 as a 13 year old.

On the outbreak of war, he joined the 2/4th Machine-Gun Battalion and was eventually posted to Singapore . He was a made a prisoner-of-war when Singapore fell on the 15th February 1942, spent some months in Changi prison and then was sent north to work in the Burma-Thai railway line later in the year.

He died in March 1943 as a result of malnutrition, disease and mis-treatment by his captors. He was 36 years of age.

The Hale School museum has procured a small length of the Burma-Thai railway line and on it, together with two other Haleians who met a similar fate, Arthur's name is inscribed.

Laid by Mr Jim Elliot, representing the 2/4th Machine-Gun Battalion Association

Plaque No 106:

A.L. (Arthur) Forsyth (Entered Hale School 1918)

He lived in Mount Lawley and entered Hale School as a fifteen year old in 1918. On leaving school he worked as an accountant before joining the Western Australian 2/28th Battalion in 1942.

He was posted to the New Guinea theatre of operations and was appointed the batman to Haleian Colonel Hugh Norman, the commanding officer of the battalion at the time. He lost his life crossing the Busu River in the assault on Lae against Japanese forces on the 9th September 1943. He was 41 years of age.

Laid by his sons, The Reverend Alan Forsyth and the Reverend Dr John Forsyth.

Plaque No 107:

D.G. (Don) Taylor (Entered Hale School 1930)

He entered Hale School from Fremantle as a 13 year old in 1930. His report notes that he had both good scholastic application and ability and that he was also good at games.

After leaving school he trained as an accountant and on the outbreak of war he joined the Royal Australian Air Force and trained as a pilot.

While serving with Number 31 Squadron, flying Beaufighter aircraft, he was killed at Millingimbi in the Northern Territory on the 25th September, 1943. He was 26 years of age.

Laid by his daughter, Mrs Karen Crellin.

Plaque No 108:

Eric M. Connor  (Entered Hale School 1936)

He entered Hale School in 1936 from Northam. He was listed as an excellent boxer, was in the 1st XVIII football team and his report describes him as having the makings of a fine type of young man.

He joined a bank after leaving school and, upon the outbreak of war he joined the Western Australian 2/28th Infantry Battalion and was posted to the Middle East with them.

After service in the North African campaigns, he completed an officer's training school in Cairo before being transferred to the 2/43rd Infantry Battalion back in Australia . He was serving as a platoon commander with that unit when he was killed in the push toward Lae, against Japanese forces, in September 1943. He was 23 years of age.

Laid by his sister-in-law, Mrs Billie Connor.

Plaque No 109:

C. (Charles) Zeck (Entered Hale School 1930)

He entered Hale School from Mount Lawley as a 13 year-old in 1930. After leaving in 1933 he began training in accountancy and business management but eventually took over the family hairdressing business in Perth .

He joined the 2/43rd Infantry Battalion, saw service in the Middle East in North Africa and subsequently went with his unit to Papua New Guinea . He was killed in action near Lae in New Guinea on the 3rd October 1943. He was 38 years of age.

Laid by his daughter, Jill

Plaque No 110:

Leonard D. Oliver (Hale School 1923-1929)

He attended Hale School from Claremont between 1923 and 1929. He was the second of five sons and a daughter in the prominent sporting family of Bert and Gwenevieve Oliver, who ran a tailoring business in Perth .

Like his brother, Olympian, Percy Oliver, Len was a keen swimmer and specialised in breaststroke at school, club and state championship level.

Upon leaving school, he worked for the shipping division of Dalgetys, was a member of the North Cottesloe Surf Life Saving Club, played football for Claremont and East Perth and sailed the 16 foot skiff, "Joyous" at the Royal Freshwater Bay and Mounts Bay Yacht Clubs.

He married Madge Dix in 1939 and the couple had a son before Len joined the Western Australian 2/28th Infantry Battalion after war broke out.

He served in the Middle East with his unit and, after promotion to sergeant, was transferred to New Guinea . He was killed in action at Finsschaffen on the 20th October 1943. He was 30 years of age.

Laid by his brother, Haleian Mr Percy Oliver, assisted by his nephew, Mr Frank Oliver

Plaque No 111:

William Keith ('Bob') Millard (Entered Hale School 1936)

He was born in 1921 and entered Hale School in 1936. While at School he was an accomplished tennis player and a rower.

After leaving he joined the National Bank and was eventually transferred to Bunbury. It was from here that he joined the 2nd AIF and travelled to the Middle East to serve with the Western Australian 2/28th Infantry Battalion.

He returned to Australia with that unit early in 1943 and was with them when they were sent to serve in Northern New Guinea later in that year.

On a patrol in the Finschaffen area of operations early in December 1943, Bob Millard's group was ambushed by Japanese troops and he was severely wounded. His mates eventually extricated him and managed to deliver him to an aid post for treatment. He died of wounds, however, on 7th December 1943. He was 22 years of age.

Laid by his brother-in-law, Haleian Athol Stone, a good friend at school Hew Mellor
and by the then President of the 2/28th Infantry Battalion Association of Western Australia, Haleian Mr Peter Salmon.

Plaque No 112:

G.C. (Gwynne) Harris m.i.d. (Hale School 1926-1933)

He attended Hale School from 1926 to 1933 from Guildford . At school he was a member of the Head of the River crew and, too, was a fine athlete. In 1934 he won the 880 yards Hale School championship.

After leaving school he became a District Patrol Officer in New Guinea and when war broke out he was commissioned into the Special Intelligence Service and began the highly dangerous task of operating behind Japanese lines in the jungle.

For his part in the evacuation of hundreds of troops and civilians from Rabaul early in 1942, he was awarded a Mentioned-in-Despatches citation for his commendable efforts during a difficult time.

For a year longer he operated in highly dangerous positions until he was finally withdrawn, despite his protests.

Eventually he was selected to lead a reconnaissance of the Hollandia region in New Guinea in March 1944, as a prelude to an Allied invasion. The presence of the party was quickly detected by the enemy and they were attacked on the following morning. Captain Harris lead his men with great courage in the ensuing action but, after a day, they were overwhelmed and captured. As a mark of respect to a gallant foe, the Japanese executed Gwynne and his fellow officer.

Laid by Vietnam veteran, Mr Chris Brooks, a representative of the Highgate branch
of the Returned Services League, the organization who have been so helpful in the supply of Hale's memorial plaques.

Plaque No 113:

R.N.G. (Ross) Zimbulis

He attended Hale School in the 1930s and when war broke out he joined the Royal Australian Air Force and trained for aircrew through the Empire Air Training Scheme.

He was posted to Bairnsdale in Victoria , an airfield that tragically provided many difficulties for aircrew during the war. Ross died on active service there on the 4th April 1944.

Laid by former Hale School headmaster and Royal Australian Air Force pilot, Dr Ken Tregonning, who also spent some time at Bairnsdale during the war before being posted to England for further duties.

Plaque 114:

Mathew R. (Ronald) Wilson (Hale School 1917-1926) 

He was the son of Hale School Headmaster, Mathew Wilson. He attended Hale School from 1917 to 1926 and in his final year was a prefect, was a fine footballer and cricketer and represented the School as a long jumper, hurdler and high jumper in the Inters athletics programme.

He eventually joined the 2/4th Machine Gun Battalion after the outbreak of the war and, after training, was sent to Singapore . He was taken captive when that city fell on 15th and, after a time in Changi Prison, he was sent as part of a work party, "E" Force, to Borneo in 1943.

He died at Sandakan , North Borneo of malaria and meningintis on Christmas Day 1944. He was 35 years of age.

Laid by his nephew, Mr Jim McManus.

Plaque No 115:

S.C. (Sam) Clarke (Hale School 1928-1929)

He attended Hale School from Nedlands in 1928 and 1929, with his twin brothers Colin and Ken.  He was a capable scholar and an outstanding sportsman at school and represented the state as a schoolboy footballer.

After leaving school he won the state senior high jump championship in 1932 and then joined the Claremont Football Club and was the first player ever to win the Sandover Medal in his first year playing league football, 1933 - he followed by winning the medal in the following year as well. He was to represent the state in football from 1934 to 1939.

After the outbreak of the war he joined the Royal Australian Air Force and trained as a pilot. Eventually he was transferred to No 8 Squadron to fly Beaufort bombers from Aitape in Northern New Guinea . against Japanese targets further northward.

He and his crew were posted missing on their first operational flight against Japanese targets further northward. It is believed the aircraft was caught in a heavy tropical storm. Neither the crew nor the aircraft have ever been found.

Laid by his Haleian brother, Mr Ken Clarke,
himself a Beaufort pilot during the Second World War.

Plaque No 116:

John Knox Thomson (Hale School 1937-1939)

He attended Hale School between 1937 and 1939 from Lake Mears , near Dangin.

He joined the Royal Australian Air Force after the outbreak of the war and was eventually posted to No 20 Squadron, a unit which was to operate Catalina aircraft on long-range operations out of Darwin .

He lost his life on 28th January 1945

Laid by Mr Tom Hoar, a former Deputy Headmaster of Hale School and himself a navigator with No 43 Squadron which operated Catalina aircraft out of Doctor's Gully in the port of Darwin during the war.

Plaque No 117:

J.I. (John) Vetter (Hale School 1930-1936)

He attended Hale School from South Perth between 1930 and 1936. His school report lists him as having average ability, having a poor attitude and being only fair at games.

After the outbreak of war, he joined the Royal Australian Air Force and trained as a flight mechanic. He was eventually posted to No 11 Squadron which operated Catalina flying boats on the long range patrols into enemy held territory to the north of Australia .

On one such operation the aircraft was forced down by Japanese aircraft. The crew were held in a native hut on the island of Ambon . While there they managed to carve their names and details into the roof timbers and they remained undiscovered by their captors until later in the war.

He and his fellow crew members, though prisoners-of-war, were executed at Ambon on the 6th February 1945. John was 24 years of age.

Today the John Vetter Memorial Prize is awarded annually to the Year 11 boy at Hale School who shows noteworthy application in both his studies and extra-curricular activities.

Laid by his boyhood friend, Haleian Hew Mellor.

Plaque No 118.: 

Flt Sgt D.J.I. (Jock) MacCleod (Hale School 1938-1939)
G.R.S., RAAF
D.O.A.S.

Rosedale , Victoria
24 February 1945, aged 22

He attended Hale School from Kalamunda in 1938 and 1939.

After leaving school he studied law at the University of Western Australia while a resident at St George's College .

He joined the Royal Australian Air Force on 8th May, 1943 and after qualifying as a pilot he was posted to the General Reconnaissance School at Rosedale in Victoria .

He was killed in a training flight on 24th February 1945. He was 22 years of age.

Dedicated by Hale School
Laid by Mr Tom Hoar, a former Deputy Headmaster of Hale School . Mr Hoar also served in the Royal Australian Air Force during World War II and was also, like Jock MacCleod, a resident at St George's College while studying at the University of W.A.

Plaque No 119:

Charles I. Cox (Hale School 1937-1938)

He attended Hale School from Katanning in 1937 and 1938. His school records describe his ability as good, with excellent application.

Upon leaving school he joined the staff of the Commonwealth Bank and after the outbreak of war he joined the Royal Australian Air Force and trained as a pilot.

Subsequently he was posted to 35 Transport Squadron and then later into 200 Flight of the air force, which was associated with the  highly secret operations of "Z" Force Special Unit which operated behind enemy lines to the north of Australia.

He was posted as 'Missing in Action' on 25th March 1945 when the Liberator bomber aircraft he was flying disappeared while on an operational flight supporting "Z" Force operations. Today his name is on the "Z" Force memorial on Garden Island and also on the Labuan memorial in Borneo .

Laid by his brother, Haleian Dr Fred Cox.

Plaque No 120:

Frank R. Noble (Entered Hale School 1934)

He entered Hale School in 1934 from Crawley .

After the outbreak of the war he joined the 2/4th Machine-Gun Battalion in November 1940 and after training at Northam was sent with his unit to Adelaide and then to Darwin. The battalion eventually reached Singapore on 24 January 1942, as the Allied forces were rapidly retreating before the Japanese advance. Singapore was surrendered by the Allies several weeks later.

After some months in Changi, he was taken to North Borneo as a member of the "E" Force prisoner-of-war labour contingent working around Sandakan .

As the war drew to a close the Japanese began a series of force-marches from Sandakan to Ranau. Prisoners, suffering from disease and  malnutrition, had to walk 200 kilometres through inhospitable, tropical terrain across the mountains to Ranau. Only six men, of the 2,500 prisoners who were forced to participate, lived to tell the tale. One of those who perished was Frank Noble. He died on 24th May 1945. He was 24 years of age.

Today the Frank Noble Systems Workshop, part of the Hale School Peter Wright Technology Centre at Hale School , has been dedicated to the memory of Frank by his family.
Laid by his nephew, Haleian Mr Michael Gregg.

to the Korean War Plaques

Memorial Grove

Introduction

Pre WW1 (1)

WW1  
Gallipoli (2-15)
Western Front (16-43)

WW2
    RAAF/RAF (44-65)
    Middle East (66-83)
    South West Pacific (84-121)

Korea (122- 23)